Posted on: 2015-10-31 by Guest

The Village`s Ghost I was lying down on the cold tile of a kitchen, similar to the one I remember using at the villa in Quepos, Costa Rica where my family went on vacation many years ago. I stood up and began floating into the air. Beneath me, I saw my body still on the floor, lying just by the electric stove. The stove had apparently short circuited somehow and electrocuted me. The one at the villa in the real world had in fact given us a few jolts, so my manner of death seemed well connected to my memories. I felt no pain- in fact, I felt more peaceful than I have in a long time. Yet somehow, I was not content there. It was time for me to move on from that place. I left the home I was in and found myself surrounded by a small, beautiful village. It had gorgeous gardens, filled with every color of flower imaginable. The buildings were of an old, yet appealling red brick style. It was easy to call the place my home. The town was closed in on three sides by a steep rock face. I felt the urge to climb it, and ascended it quickly without ropes. I had little need for such things as I was no longer constrained by fear of death. The climb seemed effortless and I felt free from the burdens of life. When I reached the top, I found a man who held a book of names. He found a page with my name and told me I was not yet ready to be released from the Earth, and that I must attend to my unfinished business. He told me to go to a particular building, check in and receive my duty. I descended the cliff and went to the building. The person working the desk told me that I had one day to attend to any personal matters, but after that I must commence my service. I would have to go to a particular computer lab and set of prompts asking me to discuss my failures in life, the lessons behind each of them, and several other questions. She said I had as much time to work as I needed, but that my assignment required 1000 pages in total. I visited my work station and the person working to the right of me asked me how much I would have to write. He was shocked at my response and told me I recieved a much shorter assignment than many. He was required to meet 6000 pages, while the person to my left was assigned 5000. Seeing as I had a day to spend, I decided to visit one of my close friends and talk to him, knowing he was in mourning over my death. He saw me and rejoiced. We talked and laughed for several hours, recieving many strange looks from people who presumably could not see me. From there perspective, there was only a tall student conversing and laughing with no one. We eventually said our final goodbyes and went our separate ways, both wishing we could spend more time together. Soon enough, I made my way back towards my workplace and bumped into a woman. I remembered her from my dream-life- she had been someone I loved deeply, though my emotions had never been reciprocated. She had found someone else, fallen in love, and created a beautiful family. I had stayed good friends with the woman and helped her family in whatever way I could out of my love for her. I wanted her family to be happy, even though I could never truly be a part of it. She was on her way to the climb the cliff with her two young children and her husband, as her family and many others did each Friday. I joined them and we all sat together at the top. The husband could not see me, but the woman and her children could. I felt a strange beckoning for me to begin my assignment and told the others that I would have to leave soon. Knowing they would not see me again in their lives, the children wept. I held them close and told them they would be alright, especially with such good, loving parents. I said I would find a way to keep an eye on them in case they ever needed help. I shook their father's hand and wished him luck before turning towards the woman. I hugged her tears welled in my eyes. This, I knew, would be the last time I would see her for a long time. She told me I had been a wonderful friend and that I was gone too soon. I told her something she had long known; I told her I loved her. As the sun set over the opposite rock face, turned away from the family I cared so much about. I sighed, wishing I had more time. I wanted to embrace my last moments of liberty before accepting my new burden. I looked down at the village from the escarpment, and I leapt. I felt a perfect freedom from all constraints. At last, I felt truly happy